4 Tips for Freelance Writers Who’re Starting Over

Carol Tice

Tips for Freelance Writers Starting Over. Makealivingwriting.comBy Linda Formichelli

Are you struggling to make a career shift into freelance writing? Having a hard time finding freelance writing jobs for beginners? I can sort of relate.

I recently decided to (at least partly) change careers: After many years as a freelance writer, I’m now a certified personal trainer and a professional wellness coach specializing in working with writers and people with depression, anxiety, ADHD, or simply a lot of stress.

Yesterday I had a session with my own life coach, and she had me hash out exactly how much I want to earn and how much work I’m willing to do. If all turns out the way I want it to, I’ll have four full days of personal coaching and training clients.

And at the rates I’m charging as a relative newbie, I’ll be making half as much as I earn as a writer.

Luckily, I still have my writing, which I don’t plan to quit; I’ll just need to cut down to one or two assignments per month. And of course, I’ll still be teaching my e-course, teaching the Blast Off class with Carol, selling e-books — and joining Carol as one of the experts hanging out in the Freelance Writers Den. I will be the Other Den Mother, starting in November!

But for all of you out there who are getting into writing from a full-time job: I feel ya. I now know what it’s like to start over, to be spending more time marketing than actually making money, and to try to juggle three different jobs and a family (which includes a toddler) at once.

Here’s what I’ve learned so far in my journey and how it can help you succeed as a writer:

1. Don’t Freak

When you start over in any industry if you’re in an established career, you’re likely to take a hit in income. My life coach assured me that everyone goes through the same experience of having to work their way up and find clients who are willing to take on a newbie. Luckily, with writing, all you technically need to get a gig is one impressive clip or writing sample.

2. Market, Market, Market

Right now I’m spending way more time marketing than actually doing paid work. Thankfully I still have my writing to pay the bills.

If you have a full-time job and are looking to build up your writing career, you’ll need to fill all your odd hours with marketing: Writing queries, networking, sending letters of introduction, connecting with editors and potential clients on social media like LinkedIn.

3. Go Back to School

I studied my ass off to pass the personal training exam, and hired my old trainer to teach me how to come up with effective workout plans for people with varying health conditions and goals. As for coaching, I’m in the middle of a 13-week certification course that includes teleclasses and tons of reading, and I also talk to my own coach three times per month. This is a definite investment of time and money, but if you want to break into a new career, you need to learn the ropes.

The same goes for writing. There are tons of classes out there that will help you speed up the learning curve, websites for writers like the Freelance Writers Den that include forums and learning opportunities, and people like yours truly who mentor writers. You can also find enough reading material online and off to read up on the writing industry until your eyeballs fall out. Take advantage of these resources!

4. Have an Exit Plan from Cheap Work

I did a lot of coaching and training for free to get practice and build word of mouth, but it had a limit: 50 free wellness coaching sessions and as many free personal training sessions as I could fit into six weeks. After those fill — I charge, baby. And I plan to raise my coaching rates after 90 days, and then again 90 days after that.

Many writers make the mistake of writing for free indefinitely as they try to reach some mystical, magical number of clips that will open the doors to paying magazines. Instead, have an exit plan for the freebies or you’ll be stuck writing for no pay forever. For example, you can plan to write three sample brochures for local businesses you like, and then use those samples to go after paid writing jobs (and also pitch the recipients of your freebies!).

Every professional writer has been where you are — hell, I’m there right now in a different career. Study, learn, market, and have a plan to leave the low-paying clients and soon you’ll be a professional writer, too.


43 Comments

  1. Lassa

    Great post, the income hit you take when you move from 1 job to another is often worth it as a chance in career can be so refreshing and just give you a moral life boost. I have just started training to become a teacher after 4 years in IT

  2. Krissy Brady, Writer

    YAY Talk about having the best Den Mothers EVER! I just registered last night and I’m so excited to take part.

    I especially agree with point #4: this was a mistake I made with my web design business, and it is the #1 factor as to why it’s been so difficult for me to transition into my writing. It’s a mistake I definitely won’t make twice! Setting limits and standards is so important right out the gate so you don’t end up stringing yourself too thin with very little results.

    • Carol Tice

      Excited to have your participation in the Den, Krissy! Glad you’re getting in before the doors close tomorrow.

    • Krissy Brady, Writer

      Thanks so much Carol! I’m having such a blast in the Den so far! 🙂

    • Linda Formichelli

      Thanks for joining the Den!

      Yes…if you want to write for free or super cheap once to get a clip, fine. But in my eyes, you really don’t have to work for free AT ALL. That class of mine you’re taking? I’ve had plenty of students break into mags big and small with zero clips. It’s all about wowing an editor with your idea and your pitch.

    • Krissy Brady, Writer

      I totally agree–as far as I’m concerned, go big or go home! I never want writers to go through what I’ve had to go through to finally be able to make the transition to writing.

  3. Cindy

    Great post! Congrats on your career move…and, I totally ‘get it.’

    I am recently (in the past couple years) moving from an uber-successful petsitting biz into freelance writing…why? Especially since I was making such great money simply feeding cats and walking dogs? And since soooo many people have said, ‘Gee! I wish I could be you! Playing with kitties and dogs all day! What fun!’

    Well, b/c I did it for 14+ years, and…enough is enough.

    Just today, I was thinking back on the very HARD marketing I had to do to make the petsitting biz a success…I had to post ads, answer calls, show up on client interviews and show people that, yes, they could trust me with the keys to their home and the lives of their pets….over and over and over, I had to do that. Until one day, I didn’t. Until calls just came in, and work landed at my doorstep. Until–even when I got referrals to new clients from sastified customers–I could say, ‘I’m sorry, I’m not taking on new clients at this point.’ It was so ‘ca-ching!’ after a couple of years! Cha!

    I’m thinking about those days a lot as I start out fresh and anew in a brand new venture…I’m placing ads, answering the phone, showing up to prove that I am, yes, trustworthy and that I can, yes, do the job…superbly.

    I’m looking forward to the ‘ca-ching!’ again, when I don’t even have to lift a finger, and work just shows up at my door.

    I know it can happen! I have complete faith in the process.

    • Linda Formichelli

      Ha ha, it sounds like 14 years is the magic number where people burn out!

      Yes…you will get to that “ca-ching” stage. I’m at the point where I mostly work with clients who come to me with work, which is nice.

  4. nicole

    Looks like I have one more reason to get to work on that blog I’ve been meaning to launch . . I don’t have a problem picking up the phone or hitting the street and marketing myself,

  5. ghostfighter0506

    Great post, Linda. I don’t have a problem picking up the phone or hitting the street and marketing myself, but actually setting marketing goals has never been a priority. But it needs to be!

    • Linda Formichelli

      I hope setting marketing goals works out for you!

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